All posts tagged: video

February Book

Image by Katherine C. The only thing getting us through this month is the promise of chocolate (whether bought by someone else, or yourself. No shame). The weather’s not great. Awful, actually. We’re months away from spring. And we’ve just said a long goodbye to the Obama’s. So, let’s embrace February as a¬†month of romance. Whether Valentine’s Day is your¬†favorite or least favorite holiday we can all agree there’s no better upper than a good love story. So we’re taking you back to a classic¬†romance to end all romances (well, no, that wouldn’t be good… but you get what we mean).   Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen, is a world-renown classic. First published in 1813, and set in the early 19th century, it tells the story of Elizabeth Bennet (and her family) and her struggles with English manners and upbringing styles of¬†her time. We’re probably telling you what you already know, but for those of you who haven’t read this one, we’ll go on with our basic summary. Mr. and Mrs. Bennet’s five unmarried …

March Book

Image ¬© NPR.org Every year Hollywood’s awards season starts in November and doesn’t end until late February. The Golden Globes, Screen Actors Guild Awards and the Academy Awards are some of the most well-known (probably because their red carpets get full E! coverage). And if you’re anything like us, you make time to watch all the fashion, speeches, glitz, and glamour of self-congratulatory Hollywood. But there’s one pattern we’ve noticed over the years, and that’s the number of nominated films that are based on books. In fact, of the 87 films awarded the Academy Award for best picture since its inception in 1928, 62 have been based on books. This year alone, seven of the eight films nominated for best picture are based on books: The Big Short, Bridge of Spies, Brooklyn, The Martian, Room, The Revenant, and Spotlight. So, as you may already know, March is our Screenplay month when we read a book that’s been made into a movie and ask ourselves the question; is the book really better than the movie? Which brings us to our book choice this …

March Book

It’s finally here, our first¬†Bookly Club book!¬†First things first. As you¬†may already know, each book¬†we read is¬†meant to fit¬†the time of year in which we read it.¬†And the¬†theme for this month is “Screenplay.” Did you spend any time this winter¬†watching the¬†Golden Globes, SAG Awards or¬†Oscars? Well, we just passed¬†awards season, and since we’re stuck in bitterly-cold climates (if you’re not, count yourself lucky) those shows were¬†among the few highlights during¬†this sub-zero season.¬†So in honor of Hollywood’s recent self-congratulations, we’re reading a book that’s been made into a movie.     In fact, this book has¬†been made into an award-winning film which has won a lot of praise during the most recent awards season.¬†Published in 2009,¬†Still Alice¬†is a story of a woman actively fighting her battle with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. A terrifying illness affecting¬†millions. The first-time author, Lisa Genova, has her Ph.D. in neuroscience from Harvard University and tells the¬†compelling story of 50-year-old Alice Howland’s demise into the frightening world of forgetting. It seems like this¬†will be a really hard story to read, especially for those …

The Design of Reading

If you love the smell of rich old books, the sound of turning a page, the creative power of cover design, or the satisfaction of putting a good book up on the shelf like hanging a picture of a happy memory you will want to watch this film. ¬†If not, you¬†need¬†to watch this film. What is the future of the printed book? ¬†Hanah Ryu Chung examines this question in the student film¬†Epilogue ‚Äď The Future of Print¬†with a ¬†beautiful appreciation for the art and craft of book making and the experience of reading. ¬†Chung explores the city of Toronto and its close-knit community of independent booksellers (maybe the printed word‚Äôs biggest fans) and asks them where they believe the printed page is going.