Month: November 2016

Deeply Disturbing

Whoa. That was … interesting. Somehow it felt very 70’s. I’m not sure why. Were the 70’s filled with child abuse and incest? This book would make you think so. Yikes. So yeah, Flowers in the Attic was very dark. I guess that’s to be expected considering the fact it’s about a narcissistic mother who locks her four children in an Attic for years. There’s that tiny happy part in the beginning, and then you just drudge for hundreds of pages through the poor lives of these innocent children living like abused zoo animals. It was pretty sad at parts, and really disturbing at others. And to what end? I’m not sure. I feel like for a book to have such dark and disturbing content there should be a reason for it… a particular message, lesson learned, or necessary story to tell. But with Flowers in the Attic there didn’t seem to be a need for half of it… like when Chris feeds them his blood. Really? Although, I will say I liked the ending. It …

Books Heal

This election, elections of any kind for that matter, should (should have) spark people’s interest in their civic duties and obligations to each other as American citizens and, more importantly, as global citizens. So, no matter your politics, what can we do to work better together, move forward, and improve this country for all its citizens? Well, there are a number of options, but here we’re all about books. Clearly. So read. Read as much as you can, as often as you can. Learn. Learn more and more. Never stop broadening your knowledge of people, history, politics, the world, the universe, our health, our future. So let’s keep striving to be better, and read. Here are some of our suggestions of where to start: Welcome to the Universe by Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael A Strauss, J Richard Gott III Mom & Me & Mom by Maya Angelou Profiles in Courage by John F. Kennedy Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari The Fire Next Time by …

November Book Announcement

With November comes the start of the holiday season, which means lots of family time… and that can mean tension, frustration, and sometimes drama. Which brings us to our November pick: Flowers in the Attic by V.C. Andrews. The first in the popular Dollanganger series, this disturbing tale tells the story of the Dollanganger kids. Hidden in the attic because of a family fortune, Chris, Cathy, and the twins are prepared to stay in the creepy alcove for a few days. But soon those days turn into years, and they are forced to adapt to this new life, isolated and with very little to survive. Written in 1979, Flowers in the Attic was what launched Andrews’ extraordinary career and creating a loyal fanbase. Now a Lifetime movie, this haunting novel will make you happy for the family you have. From the back cover: “This enduring masterpiece of psychological suspense remains the most famous and provocative novel from V.C. Andrews, one of the most popular storytellers of all time.”

Pleasantly Surprised

Hi all! Sorry I’m a little behind the curve this month. Non-stop coughs and stuffy noses have kept me preoccupied. But I’ll get to the point. I really enjoyed our October book! I didn’t have many expectations. Until voting on this as our October selection I hadn’t even heard of this book. But it was a pleasant surprise. I thought it was a great story, and it was very well written. It was hard to read at times, considering it was about the abduction of a daughter, and the subsequent but inevitable decline of a formerly nuclear family. But I was on the edge of my seat the entire 375 pages. I loved how the author referred to certain characters as just “he” or “the boy.” It gave the characters just enough anonymity to build relatability. But at the same time, he managed to write the characters with such depth and realism. I love when a writer can tell you so much in just a few words. And that’s what it was like reading Descent. Johnston …

A [Thrilling] Ride Through the Rockies

Most of the time when I pick up a suspense novel I expect writing that’s okay, but nothing too notable–which never bothers me, as long as I’m entertained. So I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked Tim Johnston’s way with words. He does a phenomenal job of depicting each personality, describing the environment, drawing out the tensions–allowing you to really absorb yourself in the story , despite the fact that it’s not your typical edge-of-your-seat thriller. While the story starts in a dramatic fashion, the majority of the novel is a very slow burn, setting up the characters–and I consider the Rocky Mountains to be one of them–in a way that makes you in no hurry to get to the end. In fact, the way in which Johnston incorporates the book’s setting is something at which he’s particularly skilled. There are still some things I’m working through–Caitlin’s mother, recurring themes that I don’t know what to make of, Sean and his role in the family–all signs that this is a book I won’t …